Conservative Republicans Look to Delay Obamacare in CR

Republicans coalescing around plan to delay Obamacare.

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Rep. Tom Graves, R-Ga., who wrote the bill to defund Obamacare, now wants to delay its implementation instead.

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Rep. Tom Graves, R-Ga., is rallying the conservative troops around a plan to delay the implementation of Obamacare using the country's spending bill.

"We are going to have broad support for an amendment that we are going to push for our leadership to adopt," Graves told U.S. News "That is to postpone, delay, the implementation of Obamacare for a year."

[READ: John Boehner's Tough Choice]

Graves says Obama's law is just not ready for implementation.

"There are a lot of questions still unresolved," Graves says. "This is not about the president in any way as much as he would like the think it is. It is about the American people. When something is not ready, it is not working, it is not right, then we owe it to them to do the right thing and say let's hold."

Graves wrote the legislation to defund the Affordable Care Act through the country's funding bill, which passed the House Sept. 20, but was ultimately rejected by the Senate.

Friday, the Senate stripped the language from its bill and sent it back to the House without a defund provision.

At this time GOP leaders say they are weighing all the options, but that no decision on the next step forward has been made.

"We're reviewing our options, and will discuss them with members tomorrow," Speaker John Boehner's spokesman Michael Steel told U.S. News.

The House is expected to meet Saturday on Capitol Hill to move forward.

[MORE: Obama Must Bargain on Debt Ceiling, Boehner Says]

Meanwhile, President Barack Obama applauded the Senate's passing of a clean continuing resolution during a press conference Friday. He urged the House to follow the Senate's lead.

"Now it is up to the Republicans in the House of Representatives to do the same," Obama said. "The House Republicans are so concerned with appeasing the tea party that they have threatened a government shutdown."

Obama urged House Republicans not to expect a negotiation on the country's funding bill nor its debt ceiling increase, which must be raised by Oct. 17.

The House has less than four days now to develop a plan to avert a government shutdown.

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