Egyptian Court Bans Muslim Brotherhood

All assets to be seized from conservative Islamist party of former President Mohammed Morsi.

Multiple news outlets reported late Tuesday that the Obama administration does plan to suspend some aid to Egypt.

Multiple news outlets reported late Tuesday that the Obama administration does plan to suspend some aid to Egypt.

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The Egyptian government has banned the Muslim Brotherhood, the political party whose rule of government sparked violent protests throughout the northeast African nation in July and August.

A court in Cairo has ruled to ban "all activities by the Muslim Brotherhood organization, the group emanating from it and its non-governmental organization," reported MENA, the official Egyptian news agency, according to Al-Jazeera. The court also ruled for the seizure of all Muslim Brotherhood assets.

[READ: Muslim Brotherhood Appoints New Spiritual Guide]

The ruling follows a crackdown on the activities of the conservative Islamist group following the popular uprising in Egypt in early July. These protests led to the ouster of former President Mohammed Morsi, the first democratically elected leader since the Arab Spring uprising in Egypt in 2011.

Al-Jazeera reports the ruling also opens up a larger crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood, which maintains a vast network of grass roots and political support throughout the country.

Morsi won the presidency in 2012 with 51 percent of the vote in the second round of elections.

The group has a long history of violence dating back to colonialism under Britain, according to the Council on Foreign Relations, but renounced militancy during the 1970s and 1980s.

[READ: Hagel to Egypt: Ending Bloodshed Is Up to You]

One member called this most recent court ruling a "totalitarian decision."

"You are losers," said Ibrahim Moneir, a leading Brotherhood member in an interview. The Brotherhood will remain "with God's help," he said, and not by orders of Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, the military chief who led Morsi's overthrow on July 3.

Roughly 2,000 members of the organization have been arrested since Morsi was forced from power, including prior Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie in August.

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