Navy Yard Shooting Revives Violent Game Debate But Doesn't Threaten Grand Theft Auto Fans

Video game critics face obstacles blaming massacres on violent media.

Gamers get their hands on Call of Duty: Ghosts for the first time at an event in Los Angeles on Aug. 14, 2013. The game’s publisher, Activision Blizzard, supports of a federal bill that would study on the impact of violent video games on children.

Gamers get their hands on Call of Duty: Ghosts for the first time at an event in Los Angeles on Aug. 14, 2013. The game’s publisher, Activision Blizzard, supports of a federal bill that would study on the impact of violent video games on children.

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Despite the legal and legislative hurdles, the video game industry is taking the threat of regulation seriously. In January, The New York Times reported the industry has spent more than $20 million on federal lobbying since 2008. Just this month, The Washington Post uncovered that Activision Blizzard, the game maker behind "Call of Duty" and other high profile games linked to recent massacres, had hired a high-powered lobbying firm..

For now, in the wake of the most recent rampage, Congress has signaled it would prefer to focus on access to mental health treatments.

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