Poll: Hillary Clinton Steamrolls Dems; GOP Appears Rudderless Heading Into 2016

A new survey shows Clinton with a strong base among Democrats.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, shown on Monday, Sept. 9, 2013, is a front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination, a new survey shows.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, shown on Monday, Sept. 9, 2013, is a front-runner for the Democratic presidential nomination, a new survey shows.

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Hillary Clinton continues to be the Democrats' overwhelming top choice to run for president in 2016, according to a new survey. Republicans, meanwhile, have yet to coalesce around a favorite, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Rep. Paul Ryan (Wis.), Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.) and Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.) all in the mix.

About 65 percent of Democrats and independents who lean Democratic say they would most likely back Clinton for the presidential primary nomination, according to a CNN poll released Monday. Vice President Joe Biden, who recently traveled to Iowa, one of the early nominating states, only received 10 percent support for a presidential run. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Mass., received 7 percent support, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo received 6 percent and Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley had just 2 percent.

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Clinton's career from first lady to senator from New York to secretary of state has cemented her name in voters' minds, a key part of early polling, and her performance has obviously not soured Democrats to her so far.

Christie leads the pack for the GOP, with 17 percent support among Republican and independents who lean Republican, followed by Ryan, the former vice presidential nominee, at 16 percent, Paul at 13 percent, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush at 10 percent and Rubio at 9 percent.

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, who had been making headlines for trips to Iowa and New Hampshire, received 7 percent support for the 2016 nomination. Former Sen. Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania, the runner-up to eventual 2012 nominee Mitt Romney, received just 5 percent support.

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Rubio's numbers have dropped some compared to previous polls, likely due to his role in pushing for immigration reform, a move not popular with conservatives. But Keating Holland, polling director for CNN, said there's plenty of time for movement ahead of 2016.

"Polls taken two to three years before an election have absolutely no predictive value," he said in a memo accompanying the poll results. "Do not treat this as a prediction of what will happen in 2016."

The poll surveyed 1,022 adults from Sept. 6-8 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.5 percent.

 

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