House On Track to Vote Against Syria Resolution

If the vote was held today, hill staffers say it would fail.

Secretary of State John Kerry, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey testify before the House Foreign Affairs Committee on Sept. 4, 2013.

Secretary of State John Kerry, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey testify before the House Foreign Affairs Committee on Sept. 4, 2013.

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Politics makes strange bedfellows. This was never more true than in the House of Representatives. And in the lower chamber there is a coalition that seems to come together at the most inopportune times for the Obama administration.

[READ: Kerry and Hagel Get Earful From House on Syria ]

It's the same bipartisan group of lawmakers who nearly pushed through an amendment to defund the National Security Administration earlier this summer and rallied around halting military aid to Egypt after a coup.

And it is now this same coalition that may be able to stop the U.S. from engaging in a war in Syria.

The administration expects that Congress will hold a vote next week on a resolution to strike Syria in retaliation for President Bashar Assad's use of chemical weapons.

But garnering the votes won't be easy. House leadership aides say if the vote was held today, it would fail.

"I don't think the White House has laid out a clear, consistent or forceful case for why intervention is necessary and how it will support our national security," one aide said.

While House Speaker John Boehner, Majority Leader Eric Cantor and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi have all come out publicly in support of action against the Assad regime, their rank-and-file members aren't following their lead.

[ALSO: Boehner Says Getting Votes on Syria Is up to Obama ]

According to he Washington Post's vote counter, 176 House members are leaning no or have declared they won't vote for the resolution. Only 17 are a guaranteed 'yes' and leaders aren't interested in twisting anyone's arm to get the votes.

In classified meetings and even during public hearings, skepticism is running high with leaders suspicious of the Obama administration's promise that the limited assault will have the ability to turn the tides in the civil war.

Back home, lawmakers are hearing an ear full from constituents wary of engaging in another Middle East conflict.

Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., held a series of town halls this week and heard from dozens of voters who urged him to vote against the resolution. He's listening to them.

[MORE: Democrats Divided on How to Proceed in Syria ]

"I am afraid that if we go into Syria, what started out as limited strikes, turns out to be a very long war," Amash said in a meeting with constituents. "It may not just be in Syria, it may spread to other countries too."

Rep. Austin Scott, R-Ga., also held a town hall Wednesday night in which he confided in his constituents that he's "tired of the U.S. getting involved in every country's individual disputes."

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