Spectators: 'I Think Martin Luther King Would Have Enjoyed This'

Speeches from past and present presidents show how far country has come in civil rights.

President Barack Obama speaks during the "Let Freedom Ring" commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington on Aug. 28, 2013, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

President Barack Obama speaks during the "Let Freedom Ring" commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington on Aug. 28, 2013, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

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Arthur Schwartz of Arlington, Va. was inspired after hearing speeches from President Barack Obama and former presidents Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter that he felt tried to connect the spirit of the original March on Washington with Wednesday's 50th anniversary commemoration.

"We've accomplished a lot, achieved a lot as a nation, but we still have a long way to go to the vision Martin Luther King expressed."

[PHOTOS: America Commemorates 50th Anniversary of March on Washington]

Vondell Little, a Washington native, felt that Wednesday's event would have been more effective had it been condensed with Saturday's, but overall, the speeches served as a benchmark for how far the U.S. has come in civil rights.

"Things aren't as ideal as we wished back in '63, but they are much better," said Little. "I have a nephew that's in an interracial marriage that he would not have been able to have had it not been for that march. I now work in the penthouse of a building that my mother would have been denied access into. I owe everything I am today to that march."

"I think Martin Luther King would have enjoyed this," she said.

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