Britain's Cameron Drafts UN Resolution Condemning Assad

David Cameron will introduce a U.N. resolution condemning the alleged chemical weapons attack in Syria.

British Prime Minister David Cameron's U.N. resolution will condemn the chemical weapons attack in Syria and authorize 'necessary measures to protect civilians.'

British Prime Minister David Cameron's U.N. resolution will condemn the chemical weapons attack in Syria and authorize 'necessary measures to protect civilians.'

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Following a Tuesday night phone call with President Barack Obama, Britain Prime Minister David Cameron said Wednesday he would introduce a U.N. resolution condemning the alleged chemical weapons attack in Syria that killed hundreds.

[READ: Obama Prepares to Move on Syria ]

Cameron, via Twitter, said he the U.N. Security Council has to "live up to its responsibilities."

"Britain has drafted a resolution condemning the chemical weapons attack by [Syrian President Bashar al-Assad] and authorizing necessary measures to protect civilians," Cameron said Wednesday. "The resolution will be put forward at a meeting of the five permanent members of the [U.N.] Security Council later today in New York."

Obama has discussed Syria with several heads of state in recent days, including two calls with Cameron.

"The president and Prime Minister Cameron spoke [Tuesday] as part of their ongoing consultations about Syria," the White House said Tuesday night. "The two leaders discussed possible responses by the international community to the indiscriminate use of chemical weapons on August 21 and agreed to stay in close consultation in the coming days."

Syrian government allies, such as Russia, are expected to veto the resolution. And U.N. General Secretary Ban Ki-Moon urged patience to allow inspectors time to survey the scene of the alleged attack.

"Here in the Peace Palace, let us say: Give peace a chance. Give diplomacy a chance," he said at The Hague in Geneva, according to The Associated Press. "Stop fighting and start talking."

[PHOTOS: Alleged Gas Attack Kills Dozens in Damascus ]

But American officials, including Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Secretary of State John Kerry, have already promised military action in Syria against Assad's government, which they say perpetrated the chemical attack.

"There must be a response," said White House spokesman Jay Carney during his daily briefing Tuesday. "We cannot allow this kind of violation of an international norm with all the attendant grave consequences that it represents to go unanswered. What form that response will take is what [President Barack Obama] is assessing now with his team."

Lakhdar Brahimi, the U.N. special envoy to Syria, confirmed "some kind of substance" was responsible for killing hundreds August 21.

"It does seem that some kind of substance was used that killed a lot of people: hundreds, definitely more than a hundred, some people say 300, some people say 600, maybe 1,000, maybe more than 1,000 people," he said, according to the AP. "This confirms how dangerous the situation in Syria is and how important for the Syrians and the international community to really develop the political will to address this issue seriously, and look for a solution for it."

[VOTE: Should the U.S. Intervene in Syria?]

Passing a U.N. resolution against Assad would clear the way in international law for a military strike, but Russian officials continue to insist there's no evidence of chemical weapon use by the Syrian government. The U.S. has in the past circumvented a U.N. okay for actions, via NATO, in the past.

The Syrian civil war has stretched two years and left 100,000 dead, as well as more than 1 million refugees.

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