Photos: Top Political Sex Scandals

From New York to San Diego, the limelight shines on politicians' sexual transgressions.

New York City mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner stands beside his wife Huma Abedin at a hastily called news conference on Tuesday, July 23, 2013, in New York about allegations of sexual text messages that continued after he resigned his House seat in 2011.
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If it's not pictures of a former Congressman's unmentionables circulating the globe (again), it's a gaggle of women crying foul over a groping city mayor. And if it's not a child born of an extramarital affair, it's a foot tap gone wrong in an airport bathroom sting operation. Here's a roundup of political sexscapades (in order of appearance) throughout the years:

San Diego, Calif., Mayor Bob Filner announces his intention to seek professional help for sexual harassment issues on July 26, 2013. (Bill Wechter/Getty Images)

San Diego, Calif., Mayor Bob Filner announces his intention to seek professional help for sexual harassment issues on July 26, 2013. He has recently been accused of making unwanted sexual advances by several women who worked for him.

Herman Cain, pictured at a Republican presidential primary debate, was forced to suspend his campaign on Dec. 3, 2011, after several women accused him of sexual misconduct. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)
Herman Cain, pictured at a Republican presidential primary debate, was forced to suspend his campaign on Dec. 3, 2011, after several women accused him of sexual misconduct. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Herman Cain, pictured at a Republican presidential primary debate, was forced to suspend his campaign on Dec. 3, 2011, after several women accused him of sexual misconduct while acting as the CEO of the National Restaurant Association. The group eventually provided two women with financial settlements.

Former Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y., admits to sending a lewd photo of himself to a woman and then lying about it at press conference on June 6, 2011. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Former Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y., admits to sending a lewd photo of himself to a woman and then lying about it at press conference on June 6, 2011. Weiner later admitted to sending several inappropriate messages to several women and resigned his House seat June 21, 2011. After recently announcing he will run for mayor of New York City, Weiner admitted he continued to have inappropriate relations online after leaving Congress and used the alias "Carlos Danger."

Former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford admits to having an extramarital affair with María Belén Chapur at a press conference on June 24, 2009, in Columbia, S.C. (Davis Turner/Getty Images)

Former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford admits to having an extramarital affair with María Belén Chapur at a press conference on June 24, 2009, in Columbia, S.C., after disappearing to Buenos Aires, Argentina, for six days. His wife Jenny Sanford announced their divorce on Dec. 11, 2009. He recently was elected to serve as South Carolina's 1st District congressman after winning a special election against Elizabeth Colbert Busch on May 7, 2013.

New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer holds a news conference with his wife Silda on March 10, 2008, to address his involvement in a prostitution ring. (Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer holds a news conference with his wife Silda on March 10, 2008, to address his involvement in a prostitution ring. Spitzer, a former state attorney general and first-term Democrat who pledged to bring ethics reform during his time in office, resigned two days later. Investigators say he spent $80,000 on prostitutes over the course of several years. Spitzer recently announced he will run for the office of comptroller in New York City, which will be decided Nov. 5, 2013.

Former Sen. John Edwards, D-N.C., announces his withdrawal from the presidential race on Jan. 30, 2008, in New Orleans, La. (Alex Brandon/AP)

Former Sen. John Edwards, D-N.C., announces his withdrawal from the presidential race on Jan. 30, 2008, in New Orleans, La., with his wife, Elizabeth (right), amid revelations that Edwards had an affair with filmmaker Rielle Hunter. Edwards admitted to fathering Hunter's son on Jan. 21, 2010.

Sen. Larry Craig, R-Idaho, announces his resignation during a news conference with his wife on Sept. 1, 2007, in Boise, Idaho, though he later reversed his decision and finished his term. (Troy Maben/AP)

Sen. Larry Craig, R-Idaho, announces his resignation during a news conference with his wife on Sept. 1, 2007, in Boise, Idaho, though he later reversed his decision and finished his term. Craig was found guilty of disorderly conduct for an incident in a Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport bathroom, where he tried to solicit sex with an undercover police officer. Craig later paid the FEC more than $200,000 for using campaign funds on legal fees.

Sen. David Vitter, R-La., makes his first public appearance July 16, 2007, in Metairie, La., with his wife after acknowledging his telephone number appeared in the records of the Washington D.C. escort service

Sen. David Vitter, R-La., makes his first public appearance July 16, 2007, in Metairie, La., with his wife after acknowledging his telephone number appeared in the records of the Washington, D.C.-based "D.C. Madam." Vitter did not face criminal charges and successfully won a second term in the Senate in 2010.

Former Rep. Mark Foley left the public eye after being accused of sending solicitous messages to 16-year-old congressional pages in 2006. (Wilfredo Lee/AP)

Former Rep. Mark Foley, R-Fla., left the public eye after being accused of sending solicitous messages to 16-year-old congressional pages in 2006. Foley resigned from Congress on Sept. 26, 2006, though the investigation was eventually closed due to lack of evidence.

Former president Bill Clinton thanks Democratic members of the House of Representatives who voted against his impeachment on Dec. 19, 1998. (Susan Walsh/AP)

Former president Bill Clinton thanks Democratic members of the House of Representatives who voted against his impeachment on Dec. 19, 1998, as first lady Hillary Clinton stands beside him. The president first denied having sexual relations with White House intern Monica Lewinsky before admitting to it and apologizing. The House impeached Clinton, but the Senate acquitted him.