Report: Effort to Kill Obamacare With Shutdown Won't Work

Report alleges White House will fund despite GOP threat.

A new survey shows just 27 percent young people are aware that uninsured adults will have access to new health care exchanges starting in October. Above, Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., speaks about the Affordable Care Act.

A new survey shows just 27 percent young people are aware that uninsured adults will have access to new health care exchanges starting in October. Above, Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., speaks about the Affordable Care Act.

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Conservative Republicans have threatened to force a government shutdown if Democrats include money for the president's Affordable Care Act in its bill to keep the government funded through the end of the year.

[READ: Obama Slams Health Care Law Critics]

But a new Congressional Research Service report reveals that even a government shutdown won't keep the health care law from being adopted nationwide.

According the CRS report, the administration is expected to spent roughly $1.5 billion to implement the Affordable Care Act, and if the government is forced to shut down CRS estimates the Obama administration will get the funds from other accounts to continue implementing its health care overhaul.

"It appears the substantial ACA implementation might continue during a lapse in annual appropriations that resulted in a temporary government shutdown." CRS alleges. "It seems likely that the administration will continue to rely on alternative sources of funding to support ACA implementation activities."

The report also indicated that Americans will still be required under the individual mandate to insure themselves even if the government is shut down.

The report was released as tea party stalwarts Sens. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and Mike Lee, R-Utah, gathered on the Senate floor Tuesday afternoon to reach out to voters and gin up support for their plan to defund the Affordable Care Act.

"Nothing is killing jobs more, nothing is killing the economy more than Obamacare," Cruz said on the floor.

[DEBATE CLUB: Should Congress Repeal the Affordable Care Act?]

Rubio echoed the sentiments and said that back home in Florida he is hearing from business owners who have laid off workers rather than accept the Affordable Care Act requirement that forces employers to provide employees with insurance. Under the Affordable Care Act, most businesses with more than 50 employees must provide health insurance for their workers or pay a penalty. But the White House recently delayed the so-called "employer mandate" to 2015.

"Obamacare makes it harder for people to start a business or grow an existing business," Rubio said on the Senate floor. "I want to be able to look them in the eye and say I did everything I could."

Fellow Republican lawmaker Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., who has never voted for a continuing resolution, went out to the floor to offer a reality check to Cruz, Lee and Rubio.

"Their motivations are absolutely pure. I'd love to defund Obamacare," Coburn said. But "you cannot design a piece of legislation that would defund Obamacare."

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A photo caption in a previous version of this story misidentified the senators behind a proposal to defund the Affordable Care Act.