'VEEP' Recap: Off and Running

The road to the White House has been cleared for Selina and her bumbling staff.

(HBO)
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"D.C." – the title of Season 2's finale of "VEEP" – might as well stand for "District of Chaos." (Vice President Selina Meyer declares it the district of another c-word, too crude to publish in this space.)

With impeachment hearings and interparty squabbling hanging over the president's head, the future prospects for the vice president and her staff rise and fall like a rollercoaster.First she tells them she will stepping down as vice president in two years so she can run for president in six, news that leaves her aid, Gary, clinging to her like a baby and the rest of the staff hustling to find new jobs.

[READ: 'VEEP' Season 2, Episode 9 Recap]

Then the White House chief of staff, tells her that the president will be bowing out himself, clearing Selina's way to the White House for the next election. "Why didn't he tell me this? Why are you telling me this?" Selina asks Ben, unable to hide her elation.

"Because he couldn't stomach the look like that – just like that – of unbridled joy," responds Ben, adding, "In your mind, you're doing pirouettes on his grave."

Selina shouldn't get too excited. In the brief time her staff thought they were being let go, they already found ways to complicate the vice president's imminent ascent. Her communications director, Mike, while trying to get a job with Rep. Roger Furlong, one of Selina's political adversaries-turned-allies, he accidentally tells the congressman that she plans to remove herself from the president's ticket.

"If I didn't already know how sh-tty you are at your job, you just proved it," Furlong tells Mike, angry that she has undercut his plan for them to run on a ticket together.

Meanwhile Dan, Selina's communication aid who has been vying a position in her rival Gov. Danny Chung's office, accidentally replicates language in speeches he wrote for each of them. "I had to write Selina's speech for the science fair so fast that I think I plagiarized the speech that I wrote for Chung," explains Dan, showing Amy, the VP's chief of staff, the fake, cheesy patriotic anecdote he used in both speeches. Chung tells Dan he will use the goof as political ammunition against Selina, as he too wants to run for president.

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At said science fair, Selina hears that the rumors swirling of her departure from the president's ticket have angered the White House, and the president will not be dropping out of the race after all.

"Now POTUS can't say he that he won't be running for re-election because it will look like he's being pushed out," Ben tells Selina. "So now our spineless, flip-floppy, f--k bag is staying."

The announcement that the president will be making a surprise visit to Selina's office has her thinking that he will ask her to resign as vice president all together. "Selina is about to get a 'POTal' bullet through the head and you are all about to be unemployed and homeless," Jonah, the White House liaison to the vice president, smirks to her staff.

Selina goes into a panic, wondering if she will be able to salvage political career. "I am going to run against Chung. I am going to take myself off the ticket. I'll run against Chung and I'll run against POTUS," she schemes. "It will be like a political massacre."

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But their concerns turn out to be for naught, as in the meeting, the president (whose name we don't know and face we haven't seen) tells her will be dropping out after all, paving the way for Selina's presidential run in two years.

More than just a happy ending to season 2 and to a particularly chaotic finale, the resolution that Selina will be running for president in two years sets an exciting precedent for the show's third season, with HBO announcing its renewal last month. Season 2 of "VEEP" improved on its promising-but-not-yet-great first season by raising the stakes for Selina and her staff.

Sure, they were as bumbling as ever, but the new importance the vice president's office was given – first with her midterm electoral leverage, then with her involvement in the hostage crisis – put their incompetency in hilariously high relief. One can only imagine the comic missteps that will come once they are under the microscope of a possible presidential race.