Avoiding 'Korean War II'

North Korea's threats mainly aimed at South Korea.

A South Korean protester closes his eyes as he holds a sign during a press conference denouncing the U.N.'s new sanction against North Korea, near the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, March 8, 2013.

A South Korean protester holds a sign during a press conference denouncing the U.N.'s new sanctions against North Korea.

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But both experts agree a peaceful settlement is possible.

"North Korea seems to have pulled the last tactical trick to obtain aid and settle on a peace treaty through direct talks with the U.S.," says Yu. "I think that the U.S. should have an exact understanding of the motives of North Korea, and that based on the lessons they have learned from previous dealings with North Korea they should approach North Korea in a calm and firm manner."

"It's mostly about what's going on in South Korea," says Sneider. "They're going to find a way to take the measure of these guys, one way or the other."

For a taste of what each military is capable of, check out some of these more popular online videos:

North Korea

 

South Korea

 

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