Manhunt Continues for Fugitive Who Threatened War Against LAPD

In 18-page manifesto, suspect promised revenge on former employer.

Traffic goes past a sign at San Diego State University along Interstate 8 with information about a murder suspect's vehicle, former LAPD officer Christopher Jordan Dorner, Feb. 7, 2013 in San Diego, California.

Traffic goes past a sign at San Diego State University with information about Christopher Dorner's vehicle, Feb. 7, 2013, in San Diego, Calif.

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A former Los Angeles police officer suspected to be behind five murders or attempted murders remains at large, despite a manhunt spanning 24 hours and the whole of southern California, the Los Angeles Times reports.

The fugitive, 33-year-old Christopher Jordan Dorner, is wanted for allegedly murdering the daughter of his former LAPD captain and her fiancé, as well as shooting three police officers, one fatally, in separate incidents.

Much of the case against Dorner comes from a manifesto uploaded Monday morning onto what the LAPD believe is Dorner's Facebook page. Over the course of 18 pages, the manifesto promises "unconventional and asymmetrical warfare" against police as recompense for his dismissal from the force, and the stain on his name that resulted.

The LAPD declared Dorner "armed and extremely dangerous."

Flowers are seen on a police vehicle near the area where former police officer Christopher Dorner shot and killed a policer officer and injured two others in Riverside, Calif.

"Of course he knows what he's doing, we trained him," L.A. Police Chief Charlie Beck, who was mentioned in the manifesto, told reporters. "He was also a member of the armed forces. It is extremely worrisome and scary, especially to the police officers involved."

Dorner's beef appears to be with his dismissal from the force after it determined he lied about an incident he reported to the department's internal affairs department.

[PHOTOS: Manhunt Continues for Ex-LAPD Killer]

"With the discovery and evidence available you will see the truth. Unfortunately, I will not be alive to see my name cleared. That's what this is about, my name. A man is nothing without his name," the manifesto reads. "When the truth comes out, the killing stops."

The rambling letter touches on a wide variety of topics, including the Trayvon Martin tragedy, and the importance of gun control, as well as the writer's favorite movies, actors, and media personalities. It also complains about retired Police Captain Randy Quan, who represented Dorner in the disciplinary hearings that ultimately led to his firing. The document alludes to killing Quan's 28-year-old daughter Monica, an assistant basketball coach at Cal State Fullerton, as well as her fiancé Keith Lawrence. Both were found shot to death in a parking garage Sunday night.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security officers search cars for former Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner as visitors enter Mexico from the U.S. at the San Ysidro Port of Entry in San Diego, Calif. Dorner, who had allegedly warned he would target law enforcement, is suspected of killing three people.

By Wednesday, the LAPD had issued protection details for many others mentioned in the manifesto, and begun its search for Dorner. Early Thursday morning, one officer on protection detail was shot and wounded in Corona, California. Shortly after, two officers on patrol in nearby Riverside were "ambushed" by a shooter, resulting in one death. Authorities connected the two shootings, as well as the double-homicide, and launched a manhunt, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Police in Torrance, Calif., opened fire on a truck matching the description of Dorner's Thursday morning, but its occupants were two women delivering newspapers, who were taken to the hospital with non life-threatening injuries. Later, CNN journalist Anderson Cooper announced he received a package from Dorner.

By late morning Thursday, the manhunt had expanded to include all of Southern California as well as portions of nearby Nevada. That afternoon, police found Dorner's torched truck near the ski resort town of Big Bear, which was locked down and scoured. Authorities followed fresh tracks in the snow around the vehicle, went door-to-door throughout the community, and used drones and other aircraft to search for Dorner, but did not find him, San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon said.

"I can't tell you whether he's here or not because I don't know at this point," said McMahon. "But we're assuming that he's still in the area and we're continuing to look and until we find some other information, we'll continue our search."

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