Study Shows Women Who Had Abortions Less Likely to Suffer Poverty

76 percent of women denied abortions eventually needed welfare.

A mother's pre-pregnancy weight can have an impact on her child's IQ, research shows.

A mother's pre-pregnancy weight can have an impact on her child's IQ, research shows.

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As for the economic data presented in ANSIRH's study, Scheidler believes that there are alternatives to looser abortion laws.

"What I think a study like this really points to is the need for economic policies that will provide real opportunity to women so that they won't have to turn to abortion," says Scheidler. He counts among these "authentic health care reform" for an inefficient system. Aside from that, he also says that women facing unwanted pregnancies can turn to charity organizations, including crisis pregnancy centers.

Whether the issue is framed in economic or moral terms, what is certain is that it affects plenty of Americans. According to data from the Guttmacher Institute, a nonprofit that studies reproductive issues, around half of American women will have an unintended pregnancy, and by age 45, nearly one-third of American women will have an abortion.

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  • Danielle Kurtzleben is a business and economics reporter for U.S. News & World Report. You can follow her on Twitter or reach her at dkurtzleben@usnews.com.



    CORRECTED ON 11/21/12: An earlier version of this story mischaracterized ANSIRH as a neutral organization. The group tends to do pro-choice work.