A Lot of Dough: Hostess Closure Spurs Thousand-Dollar Twinkie Sales

With the company's bankruptcy, sellers are asking thousands for Twinkies on eBay and Amazon.

A Hostess Twinkies sign is shown at the Hostess plant in Ogden, Utah, in this Nov. 15, 2012 file photo.

A Hostess Twinkies sign is shown at the plant in Ogden, Utah, Thursday.

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Some people may be taking this supply and demand thing a little too far. The announcement that snack food maker Hostess is going out of business—and taking iconic Twinkies, Ho-Hos, and Sno Balls with it—comes a spate of high-dollar Twinkie sales on Amazon and eBay.

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"Current trends indicate that there is a likelihood that Hostess Twinkies will skyrocket in value and become harder to get than Cuban cigars. DID YOU HEAR THAT? ACT NOW! These are priced to sell!" writes an eBay user selling a box of 10 Twinkies for $500.

It doesn't sound like much of a deal until you see a few of the other ads. One eBay seller has put up a box of 10 Twinkies for $10,000. In an advertisement geared to "'Zombie Apocalypse' preppers," the seller promises to give 10 percent of sales to local charities...and to put more Twinkies and Zingers up for sale later this year.

At $1,000 per Twinkie, that's still a steal, compared to another eBay user selling single Twinkies for $5,000 a pop.

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"This is your opportunity to own a piece of history, a delicious piece at that," writes the seller.

Amazon has high-dollar sellers as well, with people offering 10-cake boxes for $450, $550, and $1,000.

The market may not bear the prices that many of these good-humored sellers are asking for, as there are many other lower-cost alternatives out there: Friday, well over 300 new eBay posts selling Twinkies and Twinkie collectibles, like magnets and lunchboxes, were created. And on Amazon, sales of both 20-count and 24-count boxes of Twinkies have spiked over 2,000 percent in the last 24 hours.

Still, anybody hoping to make a big payday by selling their leftover snack cakes may soon be disappointed. Other companies could buy Hostess' brands and make their own Twinkies, meaning an end to the eBay frenzy (and, sadly, an end to the entertaining eBay posts).

Danielle Kurtzleben is a business and economics reporter for U.S. News & World Report. You can follow her on Twitter or reach her at dkurtzleben@usnews.com.