'Fox & Friends' Prankster Says He Wanted to Prove Fox News Was 'Fake'

The young man says he was trying to make a political point with his incoherent interview.

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The prankster who punk'd the morning show "Fox & Friends” says he was trying to make a political point with his incoherent interview.

Max Rice, who made a bizarre, rambling appearance on the show, got on the air by claiming to be an out-of-work recent college graduate who planned to support Mitt Romney.

He told the website, The Raw Story, later Monday that "a friend of a friend" had gotten a text message seeking recent college grads who had fallen out of love with Obama.

"Twenty emails later with the producer at Fox, they're telling me what to say," Rice said. "It's such bullsh— It's so ridiculous."

Once he got on the air, Rice drank out of a paper cup while quipping that host Gretchen Carlson, a former Miss America, was "Miss Universe, in my book."

He then rambled about meeting Obama when he was in the third grade and promising to vote for Romney after losing a basketball game.

An increasingly skeptical Carlson eventually cut him off.

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"Well, actually, we're going to wrap this up now because I'm not so sure that you're actually being totally serious,” she said.

"Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait, wait,” Rice protested. “We're not."

"Yeah, I'm not sure that you're ready for primetime yet with this interview," Carlson said with a chuckle as Rice's protests were abruptly cut off.

"Alright, we're going to give Max another chance maybe when he's ready to do the interview,” she added before moving on to the next subject.

Rice — who later said he was a former University of Texas student who had transferred to Columbia College in Chicago — told The Raw Story that he was trying to prove that Fox News is a “fake news organization.”

"They saw my [HIGH SCHOOL] commencement speech video, but they're too stupid to realize that if I graduated in 2010, I wouldn't graduate college until 2014," he said. "That's why I was so awkward in the interview. I wasn't going to lie."

"I want this story to get out because I think it's bigger than just me," he added.

By Kristen A. Lee / New York Daily News