North Carolina Lawmakers: Let Booze Flow for Democratic Convention

N.C. lawmakers propose exception to law preventing liquor sales on Labor Day.

The more exposure to alcohol ads the teens reported -- and the more they enjoyed the commercials -- the more they drank by 10th grade, the researchers found.

The more exposure to alcohol ads the teens reported -- and the more they enjoyed the commercials -- the more they drank by 10th grade, the researchers found.

By + More

North Carolina wants to ensure everybody has a good time at Democratic National Convention in Charlotte this September, and they're not afraid to change laws to make that happen.

A Charlotte-area lawmaker has proposed making an exception to state law forbidding the sale of distilled liquor on Labor Day—the day before the convention starts.

State-run liquor stores are the only place North Carolinians can buy distilled liquor, and current law requires they're closed on Labor Day and Sundays. That would mean restaurants and bars would be unable to stock up on alcohol for the two days prior to the convention rush, which means less business for the constituents of one of the bill's co-sponsors, Rep. Bill Brawley.

"The restaurants are going to be selling an awful lot of liquor on Friday, Saturday and Sunday with the Democrats coming into town," Brawley told Raleigh TV station WRAL. "Most of the restaurants would not have sufficient secure storage space to store enough liquor over the weekend."

The proposed bill would only change the law for this year and only for the Charlotte area.

Seth Cline is a reporter for US News and World Report. You can contact him at scline@usnews.com or follow him on Twitter