Penn State Officials Surrender in Sex-Abuse Case

Associated Press + More

The grand jury report that lays out the accusations against the three men cites the state's Child Protective Services Law, which requires immediate reporting by doctors, nurses, school administrators, teachers, day care workers, police and others.

It appears neither Schultz nor Curley had direct contact with the boys Sandusky is accused of abusing.

Schultz's lawyer said his client was not among those required by law to report suspected abuse. He also argued that the two-year statute of limitations on the summary offense has expired.

Curley and Schultz have the unconditional support of university President Graham Spanier, according to a statement released Saturday. Spanier called the allegations "troubling" but predicted the school officials would be exonerated.

[Check out U.S. News Weekly, now available on iPad.]

Kelly, the attorney general, said Penn State officials never made any attempt to identify the child that the grad assistant saw in the showers with Sandusky in 2002.

"Today as we stand here, we encourage that person who is now likely to be a young adult to contact investigators from the attorney general's office," she said. "This is an ongoing and active investigation. ... We are determined to quickly respond to any new witnesses or any additional information that may appear."

While Kelly said Paterno was not a target of the investigation, she did not answer yes or no when asked the same question about Spanier.

"All I can say is again, I'm limited to what's contained in the presentment, and that this is an ongoing investigation," Kelly said.

  • See 8 Politicos Who Survived Scandals
  • Check out U.S. News Weekly, now available on iPad.
  • See the month's best political cartoons.