Blagojevich Says Vindication Is Closer Than Ever

Despite his legal woes, Blagojevich isn’t closing the book on his political future.

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BY Meena Hartenstein
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

Don't say bye-bye to Blagojevich just yet.

The former Illinois Gov., who was convicted last week of lying to federal agents, says that despite his legal woes, he isn't closing the book on his political future.

"My adult life was serving the people as a congressman, as a governor. It's what I know," Blagojevich said on "Fox News Sunday." "I'm not ruling myself out as coming back, because I will be vindicated in this case. I'm significantly closer to vindication than I ever was."

Blagojevich, who was on trial for allegedly attempting to sell President Obama's vacated senate seat, now faces a second trial since his jury deadlocked on 23 counts against him.

"I'm ready for Round 2," he said.

But this time around, he wants to bring out the big guns: Democratic bigwigs who he says were just as involved in the "political horse-trading" surrounding the senate seat as he was.

Blagojevich plans to call Washington heavyweights including White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to prove that he wasn't acting alone.

He says he always "intended to call all those people" during his original trial, but didn't think it was necessary when the "government failed to prove their case."

"We didn't even put on a defense and rightfully the jury did not find any corruption," Blagojevich told Fox.

"If we put on a defense and properly explain these things, the jury will see it's exactly about what it is, political horse-trading...They did nothing wrong either."

It's been a busy weekend for Blagojevich. On Saturday the ridiculed ex-governor mingled with fans at Chicago's Comic Con, where he charged $50 per autograph and $80 per photo.

But it wasn't all fun and games - he says he was at the event because he needs the money.

"They squeeze you and your family from being able to make a living," he said of the Feds suing him. "Part of this battle that I'm in, this war that I'm in is that I have to make a living for my litle girls, my wife."