College students who use loans to pay for spring break trips and expensive electronics could still be paying a decade later, former students say.

Undergrads Blow It With Student Loan Refunds

Some undergrads use excess financial aid money to purchase cars and finance expensive trips.

College students who use loans to pay for spring break trips and expensive electronics could still be paying a decade later, former students say.
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Using their student loan money as startup capital was the couple's only option, Mascaro said, noting that she and Krudop had both previously filed for bankruptcy.

"In retrospect, I think we made the right decision," she wrote, noting that Estes Excursions made $20,000 in its first season and now brings in close to $47,000 a season, which runs from mid-May to Labor Day.

Mascaro and Krudop, both 30, currently have close to $78,000 in student loan debt, the bulk of it federal direct loans. Outside of their seasonal business, Mascaro – who graduated from Michigan State University in 2010 with a degree in journalism – makes roughly $29,000 per year as a Web designer.

Her husband, who earned a bachelor's in anthropology in 2011, has yet to secure a full-time job.

Combined, the two pay $250 a month toward their student loans on an income-based repayment plan.

"The worst part is, we have to save our cash to buy a house," she said. "Because our student loans are now so high, together, we cannot finance a house."

Meehan is in the same boat. She used both federal and private lenders, and despite consolidating her loans, recently defaulted on one of them.

"I'll probably never be able to purchase a house, car or even get a credit card," she wrote. "All for cute clothes over a decade ago!"

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