Report: Veterans Go to College But Face Challenges

Schools are trying hard to attract veterans and post-9/11 G.I. Bill funds.

The post-9/11 G.I. Bill provides tuition, a housing allowance, and book stipend for veterans to attend college.

The post-9/11 G.I. Bill provides tuition, a housing allowance, and book stipend for veterans to attend college.

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For-profit colleges are more likely than community colleges to help veterans earn credits for military training, according to Jennifer Steele, a policy analyst at the RAND Corporation who surveyed student veterans in a 2010 study. 

Student veterans also complained of being shut out of crowded classes at public two- and four-year colleges—but not at for-profit colleges. 

Veterans chose for-profit colleges for "classes that meet on evenings and weekends and focus on career-relevant skills," as well as for the choice of face-to-face or online classes, Steele writes. Tuition didn't exceed their G.I. Bill benefits, so vets didn't need to borrow. 

In the battle to enroll G.I. Bill beneficiaries, for-profit colleges are gaining ground. 

Joanne Jacobs writes Community College Spotlight for The Hechinger Report, an independent nonprofit education news site. Jacobs also blogs about K-12 education and is the author of Our School: The Inspiring Story of Two Teachers, One Big Idea and the Charter School That Beat the Odds.