Medicine Methodology

In order to determine the ranking of research medical schools; 126 schools responded to the survey.

+ More

The 125 medical schools fully accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education plus the 20 schools of osteopathic medicine fully accredited by the American Osteopathic Association were surveyed in the fall 2007 and early 2008. In order to determine the ranking of research medical schools; 126 schools responded to the survey. Of these schools, 126 provided the data needed to calculate the research rankings based on the indicators used in the research model. The same medical and osteopathic schools were surveyed for the primary-care ranking; 126 schools provided the data needed to calculate the primary-care ranking. The medical school research model is based on a weighted average of eight indicators, and the primary-care model is based on seven indicators. Both rankings are based on a weighted average of indicators, four of the data indicators are used in both the research and primary-care ranking model. The research model factors in research activity; the primary-care model adds a measure of the proportion of graduates entering primary-care specialties.

Quality Assessment (weighted by .40)

Peer Assessment Score (.20 for the research medical school model, .25 for the primary-care medical school model) In the fall of 2007, medical and osteopathic school deans, deans of academic affairs, and heads of internal medicine or the directors of admissions were asked to rate programs on a scale from "marginal" (1) to "outstanding" (5). Survey populations were asked to rate program quality for both research and primary-care programs separately on a single survey instrument. Those individuals who did not know enough about a school to evaluate it fairly were asked to mark "don't know." A school's score is the average of all the respondents who rated it. Responses of "don't know" counted neither for nor against a school. About 48 percent of those surveyed responded.

Assessment Score by Residency Directors (.20 for the research medical school model, .15 for the primary-care medical school model) In the fall of 2007, residency program directors were asked to rate programs on two separate survey instruments. One survey dealt with research and was sent to a sample of residency program directors in fields outside primary care, including surgery, psychiatry, and radiology. The other survey involved primary care and was sent to residency directors in the fields of family practice, pediatrics, and internal medicine. Survey recipients were asked to rate programs on a scale from "marginal" (1) to "outstanding" (5). Those individuals who did not know enough about a program to evaluate it fairly were asked to mark "don't know." A school's score is the average of all the respondents who rated it. Responses of "don't know" counted neither for nor against a school. About 25 percent of those surveyed for research medical schools responded; eighteen percent responded for primary-care.

The source for the names for both of the residency directors surveys was the Graduate Medical Education Directory 2006-2007 edition, published by the American Medical Association. The peer scores from the America's Best Graduate Schools 2008 edition's residency directors' survey in non-primary care fields were used again for all schools in the research medical school model because of a printing error on the survey instrument mailed out in fall 2007. Assessment data collected by Synovate.

Research Activity (weighted by .30 in the research medical school model only)

Total Research Activity (.20) Measured by the total dollar amount of National Institutes of Health research grants awarded to the medical school and its affiliated hospitals, averaged for 2006 and 2007. An asterisk indicates schools that reported only research grants to their medical school in 2007.

Average Research Activity Per Faculty Member (.10) Measured by the dollar amount of National Institutes of Health research grants awarded to the medical school and its affiliated hospitals per full-time faculty member, averaged over 2006 and 2007. Both full-time basic sciences and clinical faculty were used in the faculty count. An asterisk indicates schools that reported research grants only to their medical school in 2007.