Debate Club

Secularism Cannot Change the Truth of Christ's Birth

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Christ's long-anticipated birth brought joy and renewed hope to early Christians. That the secular world today doesn't understand and turns Christmas into a commercial parody or tacky heyday does not in the slightest diminish the significance of the day for people of faith.

[Lowe's Intolerant for Pulling Ads From "All-American Muslim".]

Wise men today still celebrate His birth. No other event in history warrants such a huge, worldwide celebration. That the Word become flesh is the reason for the season. His birth fulfilled the true promise of "hope and change," and nothing or no one else has wrought such remarkable transformation in individual lives and entire civilizations either before or since His birth. Millions attest to being reborn from the depths of depravity, depression, and despair through the power of believing in Him. Is it any wonder the birth of Jesus Christ is cause for celebration and that the Christmas season is full of festivities and joyous traditions?

In this country, we celebrate Christ's birth in the middle of winter--analogous to the Light of Truth's warmth piercing Error's frigid, hostile darkness. Christmas is the ultimate singularity, God becoming one of us that we might become one with Him—the ultimate connectedness!

Family members drive hundreds, even thousands, of miles to be home with loved ones. Friends get together for a special meal, to go to events or concerts, or just hang out. There is justifiable reason for spending quality time together, and the tangible evidences of love create bonding and renew friendships and family relationships. People of faith and non-believers alike join in festivities and enjoy the gift giving, parties, decorating, feasts, and all the excitement of Christmas.

[Remembering Christopher Hitchens.]

Despite the stress of commercialization—all the hyper-expectation, overindulgence, and excessive spending—Christmas remains, for faithful multitudes, the most wonderful time of the year. To be sure, some spend outlandish amounts of money, and others get too caught up in the hustle and bustle of the season to focus on the truth of Christmas. But even though far too many people experience only the peripheral aspects of Christmas, countless believers celebrate Christ's birth, both His coming into the world and into their hearts. And like the shepherds of old, they fall on their knees in praise, worship, and adoration.

Janice Shaw Crouse

About Janice Shaw Crouse Senior Fellow of Concerned Women for America's Beverly LaHaye Institute

Tags
holidays
religion
Christianity
Jesus Christ

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