Debate Club

It's Easy to Lose Sight of Christ at Holidays

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Imagine an innkeeper during the Roman census just outside of Bethlehem, 2,000 years ago. This man is just about the happiest man in Judea. His establishment filled to bursting, barmaids handing out food and drink. Perhaps more important to the innkeeper, real money is exchanging hands.

[Why Shoppers Will Pull Back in 2012.]

How could this possibly get better?!

So when a man and young girl with more problems than gold asked for room, what was the innkeeper to say? There's a manger out back, make due, best of luck, and then back to the business at hand.

Fast forward to modern times. The inn is gone. For what seemed wisdom at that moment, that innkeeper missed out on what more worldly modern marketing executives would have clawed over one another to get: "Jesus Christ Slept Here."

Of course, this example is a bit trite and facetious, but it does serve a point.

For all the whirlwind of commercials and presents, of games and toys, of moving around from one family function to another, it's easy to lose sight of Christ.

In short, it's easy to be the secular, worldly innkeeper.

[Remembering Christopher Hitchens.]

Sometimes it's difficult to see Jesus through all the noise. It's in these times when we're hurried or too quick on the draw where opportunities to slow down and reflect truly matter.

We are not celebrating Jesus's birthday so much as we are celebrating Jesus's birth--that great moment where "the word became flesh, and dwelt among us." (John 1:14)

Rather, we should be asking where Christ may be found this Christmas season.

Jesus is not in presents, nor is Jesus to be found in songs, parties, or even the collected stuff we seem to surround ourselves with every Christmas season.

Reflecting on that lonely manger in Bethlehem, our Christmas isn't in the gifts given to Jesus, but instead in that supreme gift Jesus gave to us all. Christ put himself here on earth to share our joys and sufferings, and ultimately to save and redeem the human race through his crucifixion and resurrection.

[Lowe's Intolerant for Pulling Ads From "All-American Muslim".]

Christ's love for us was the greatest gift ever given. Removed from all the worldly and secular noise this Christmas holiday, remember that the best gifts we can offer are the ones given in the spirit of Christian love.

About Andrea S. Lafferty President of Traditional Values Coalition

Tags
holidays
religion
Christianity

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